August Newsline: Senate panel cuts EPA budget, update on sewer debt crisis

August 2009 Vol. 64 No. 8
David Haynes

American Petroleum Institute President and CEO Jack Gerard also said the mutual conversation with labor was established to develop jobs and to ensure energy security in the United States. He said that some legislative proposals that are under debate in Congress were “not in the best interest of U.S. energy” expansion. Proposals to impose new taxes on the oil and natural gas industry would discourage new energy development and cost thousands of jobs, he said.

MMSD proposes two city sewer projects

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is looking for public input on two sewer projects proposed by the Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District (MMSD), one to serve the growing northeast side, the other to shore up deteriorating pipe on the Far East side.
The northeast-side project features an $8.3 million interceptor line stretching from Lien Road south to Nakoosa Trail, 9,250 feet of large-diameter sewer that will prevent any overflow of sewer water into Starkweather Creek, as well as allow for the abandonment of an existing overflow area near Sycamore Avenue and the abandonment of part of an existing interceptor that has corrosion damage.

The far east-side project is expected to cost about $450,000 and is for 5,500 feet of new lining on the Cottage Grove extension of the Far East interceptor, to prevent water leakage.

The Cottage Grove project will be done through existing manholes and isn’t expected to disrupt surrounding lands, but the northeast side project will cross Starkweather Creek and border some small wetlands.

The route for the new interceptor was partly chosen to minimize wetland impact, and appropriate construction controls will be implemented to protect surrounding areas, the DNR said.

MDC breaks ground to replace century-old sewer system

The Metropolitan District (MDC) is a non-profit municipal corporation chartered by the Connecticut General Assembly in 1929 to provide potable water and sewerage services on a regional basis.

The largest public works project in Hartford, CT, history began in June as a massive effort to redo part of the city’s century-old plumbing and curtail the millions of gallons of sewage and storm water that overflow into the basements, streets and streams of the North End after heavy rain.