January Newsline: EPA Cracks Down on Violations; Cat Invests in India; Stimulus Projects At Work

January 2010 Vol. 65 No. 1

Wind farm brings power to California
Pattern Energy Group LP began construction of its Hatchet Ridge wind project, the first large-scale wind project in California in late 2009. The 101.2-MW Hatchet Ridge project, developed by Renewable Energy Systems Americas Inc., will be located on a portion of Hatchet Mountain near the town of Burney in Shasta County, CA. RES America Construction Inc. will construct the project, which will consist of 44 Siemens 2.3 MW turbines. The project is expected to finish construction and reach commercial operation before the end of 2010.

Hatchet Ridge will generate power for nearly 44,000 California homes annually. Pacific Gas and Electric Company will purchase the power, including the renewable attributes, under a 15-year power purchase agreement.

In addition, Hatchet Ridge will create approximately 100 to 200 construction jobs over the next year and 6 to 8 permanent jobs during operations. There will also be an economic ripple effect in the area from the purchases of goods and services for the wind farm and increased business for service industries.

Tarlton completes historic engineering feat
Tarlton Corp., a St. Louis-based general contracting and construction management firm, completed a historic engineering feat as part of its work on the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District’s Lemay Wastewater Treatment Plant Wet Weather Expansion project. The team installed a temporary diversion around a portion of MSD’s 96-inch influent pipe as part of a multiyear project to increase the district’s peak wet-weather treatment capacity.

Once the temporary piping and a diversion structure were installed, MSD shut down flow to the plant for approximately 90 minutes so workers could remove a cap from an existing riser pipe to allow the influent to flow through the diversion structure. After draining the system of standing water, workers had less than 45 minutes to remove the cap and install a butterfly-shaped STOPPLE plug through a 60-inch opening cut in the existing 96-inch pipe at the tie-in point to force the flow through the diversion piping. They also erected six temporary steel gates in the grit structure to stop water from flowing between tanks.

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