March Newsline: Gas Line Fire Destroys Home, Dark Fiber in D.C., New Water Infrastructure Funds and More

March 2010 Vol. 65 No. 3

State investigators believe the gas line was installed through the sewer line when Xcel Energy replaced gas lines in the neighborhood in 1991.

It was reported that the resident had tried to unclog the sewer line over the weekend with no success before contacting the plumber.

After a similar incident in 2003, Minnesota's Department of Pipeline Safety issued a warning to plumbers and contractors. It read, "Utility lines may have been inadvertently installed through some sewer lines" and could pose a "risk to public safety."

Xcel Energy officials said the company reminds all of its customers once a year to contact the company if property owners plan on clearing their sewer lines. Xcel Energy will inspect the lines at no charge.

Pipeline safety officials said older homes that had gas lines re-installed in the last 20 years may be at risk. They don't know how many gas lines run through sewer pipes.

Dark fiber expands to D.C. metro area
24/7 Fiber Network, Baltimore-Washington, D.C. metropolitan area’s high capacity transport and dark fiber network provider, announced the expansion of its footprint into underserved markets throughout the Delmarva Peninsula and into the metro Washington, D.C. area.

This network expansion marks 24/7’s commitment to providing cost-effective, high capacity bandwidth solutions connecting Washington, D.C.’s metro area with the Eastern shore. The company is constructing a dark fiber footprint deep into the Delmarva Peninsula, a large area on the East Coast of the United States occupied by portions of Delaware, Maryland and Virginia. This area, considered an underserved market, will soon be connected via 24/7’s high fiber count dark fiber network 100 miles into the region’s main business districts located in Salisbury, MD, and Wilmington, DE. This network will then continue another 100 miles into the Baltimore metro area with connectivity to 24/7’s extensive Baltimore City Central Business District network footprint and from there it will connect to 24/7’s long-haul route directly into the Washington, D.C. market.

The network will deliver a fully diverse, high capacity 432-strand fiber route, fulfilling a key communications gap in the region. The existing infrastructure is antiquated and does not provide the route diversity and high bandwidth capacity required by today’s carriers, service providers and enterprise businesses. This new, next-generation network will provide a fully protected, metro area ring capable of serving modern communications infrastructures as required by wireless 3G, 4G, tower backhaul providers and carriers.

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